. .
Jean Armour Burns Trust
Jean Armour





Index Page.

JeanArmourBurnsTrust.

Donations.

Recent history of the Houses.

Glasgow and District with full history of the Houses.

Picture Gallery of the Houses.

Contact us.
Bridgeton Burns Club. Schools Competition.

The Bridgeton Burns Club was formed in 1870, and the inaugural Schools Competition was two years later in 1872.
The running costs of the Competition and Concert annually costs over £20,000, increasing every year, all of which goes on external services e.g. bus transport, hall & school hire, prizes, catering for participants accompanists and adjudicators, and administration.
Every participant receives a medal for taking part.
The Jean Armour Burns Trust helped in providing money for these medals.
The photos are taken from the competition and also from the performance at the Annual Burns Dinner.
Bridgeton Scholls Competition


St Vincent's LCR Burns Bonanza.

An organised a family event for the families of the children with St Vincent’s Learning and Communication Resource to enable the children to showcase some of the work they had learnt on Robert Burns.
The event took place on Saturday 28th January at Linthouse Bowling Club with approximately 60 people attending.
The evening included the children having a traditional Scottish sing song.
Class 2 and 4 performed an interpretation of ‘The Life and Times of Robert Burns’. The children had been rehearsing for 3 weeks in school for their big performance. The play was well received by all the guests and the children enjoyed their performance.
The décor was traditional and we had life size paintings of a piper and Robert Burns that the children had made by drawing around each other. They had also made bunting with Tartan and other famous traditional Scottish images.
St Vincent's Burns Bonanza



Lowmoss Prison Burns Supper 2017.

We wanted to introduce our students to the life and work of Robert Burns using the creative arts to explore the themes evident in his work. We were also keen to introduce the project to prisoners’ families and to create an opportunity for cross generational family learning to take place.
Prisoners wrote poems and creative writing pieces. A short digital film showing an alternative ‘Cup of Kindness’ was made in the art class and prisoners who attended music classes, performed some classic songs at the Burns Supper. The grant we received from The Jean Armour Burns Trust enabled us to update our learning resource pack.
The learning pack prompted prison based learners to respond to set learning activities in creative writing. This led to a significant body of work produced by the men which, again thanks to support from The Jean Armour Trust, will be collated into an anthology of their work.
The Burns Supper was an excellent example of how Low Moss is striving to create a safer community through enhanced relations with inmates and staff. Coming together at an event like the Burns Supper offers an opportunity to break down barriers between staff and prisoners and allows the prison community to come together in a positive, supportive and appropriate way.
Lowmoss Prison Burns Supper



Centre for Robert Burns Studies at the University of Glasgow

The successful applicants ( funded by the Jean Armour Burns Trust ) both took up their places on the course and successfully completed it.
Feedback from both participants has been extremely positive. I include testimonials below with their permission:
“I found the entire course inspirational and very rewarding - my appreciation of Burns has increased immeasurably, as has my passion for studying all aspects further.”

“I have really enjoyed learning more about Burns and want to say thanks for all your understanding.
I thought you might like to know that my 'wee' class for Scottish Studies will be creating and producing a 'Burns' themed event in January.
Its probably going to be a lunch. They will have to research his life, and present a talk to an invited audience.
They will create and design a Scottish Burns themed menu.
They will also have to select a poem or song to perform.
One of the students is a dancer and is hoping to dance to one of his songs.
We will be working on the details when we return to school. I just wanted to let you know that I will be using what I have learnt on the course to help them discover Burns.”

2017 Eastmuir Burns Project

The Trust were asked to help fund a project for the pupils of Eastmuir who have moderate learning difficulties.
This term they are learning about Scots language, a great part of their heritage.
As a part of this topic, they will learn about Robert Burns, arguably one of the most important figures in Scottish history and particularly important to the world of poetry.
It is intended that part of this learning will take place at the Burns Museum in Ayrshire, making the learning more contextualised and meaningful for the children.
The children will also learn or create a Scots poem suitable to their ability. The poems and facts they have learned about Burns will be recorded with the help of a team from the BBC.
There is a possibility that the recording will be entered into a Burns competition with pupils from similar schools.

The feedback is very positive and we at the Trust were pleased to help with this.
This project was a great success. The pupils of Eastmuir, all of whom have a range of mild learning difficulties, were able to engage in learning about Robert Burns.
They understand the significance of his contributions to Scottish history and the impact he has had on a global scale.
The children were very interested to learn about new Scots language, as well as exploring words that were familiar to them.
Since they have just celebrated New Year and Burns Day, the learning was relevant to them and they watched people from other nationalities reciting the work of Burns.
The most critical part of their learning was the visit to Burns' Cottage where they were able to interact and engage with his works at their own level.
Without this experience, the learning that took place would probably not have been possible, at the very least, it would not have been very meaningful to them.
The children really enjoyed presenting their work via the internet and having the opportunity to take on the role of director, presenter, sound person and film person when working with the BBC.

Hollybrook Academy is a secondary school in Govanhill, Glasgow for pupils with additional support needs.
There are a huge range of needs in the school, within the pupils who will be doing the Robert Burns project there are pupils with down syndrome, global development delays, visual impairment, processing difficulties and many of the pupils find reading and writing challenging.
However they enjoy music, singing and dancing.
On the 14th November 2016 we helped fund a day out at the Robert Burns Museum.
The enjoyment can be seen on the pupils faces.
Hollybrook



HMP Low Moss – Robert Burns Project

This year, the Learning Centre in HMP Low Moss attempted to introduce our students to the life and work of Robert Burns.
We chose to do this through the creative arts, using creative writing, music and art classes. In creative writing, learners were supported to read and interpret the work of Burns and to explore the themes evident in his work such as his love of his native land as well as his commentary on issues including gender, politics, religion, national identity, industrialisation and morality. As the project was rolled out across different classes, our learners readily engaged with the themes, relishing the complexities that made Robert Burns the man he was. Learners who engaged with the project were a mix of inmates including short term prisoners, long term prisoners and those on remand. All inmates in HMP Low Moss are over 21 years of age.

The Burns Supper


A significant number of the men who participated in the project experienced interruptions to their early education, some excluded from schools, with subsequent gaps in their knowledge, understanding and appreciation of key Scottish literary figure such as Burns.

The grant we received from The Jean Armour Burns Trust enabled us to produce a high quality learning resource guide which in turn prompted learners to respond to set learning activities in creative writing. This led to a significant body of work produced by the men which, again thanks to support from The Jean Armour Trust, will be collated into an anthology of their work. The learning pack and anthology will stand as a legacy of the project. The learning pack can be used again and anthologies are an excellent way to promote and display learners’ work, giving something tangible to our students which they can keep, show their families and read as and when they choose.

The Burns Supper


We were keen that the project should culminate in a traditional Burns Supper. Again, the majority of the men who took part in the project stated that they had never attended a Burns Supper. With this in mind, and mindful of the environment, we set about planning a Low Moss Burns Supper. The prison was willing to support the initiative by supplying food for the event however, we were keen to include guest speakers and musicians who could work with our project and promote the work of our learners. We felt this was achieved by the guest speaker who delivered the Immortal Memory, in a humours and engaging way, weaving the creative writing produced by prisoners into his delivery. Professional musicians created a wonderful atmosphere, performed alongside prisoners, boosting their confidence but allowing them a platform to demonstrate new skills acquired in music classes in the run up to the event.

Prisoners also recited the work of Robert Burns during the event including To a Mouse and My Love is Like a Red, Red Rose. There were also readings of students’ own work inspired by Robert Burns.

The Burns Supper was an excellent example of how Low Moss is striving to create a safer community through enhanced relations with inmates and staff. Coming together at an event like the Burns Supper offers an opportunity to break down barriers between staff and prisoners and allows the prison community to come together in a positive, supportive and appropriate way.

The Burns Supper


Those men who attended the Burns Supper stated:
“I’ve never been to a Burns Supper, ever in my life and I’m from Ayrshire! I never used to know what all the fuss was about but I really enjoyed myself tonight, I get it now.” Stephen P.
“It was brilliant when the speaker mentioned my poem during his presentation, I felt chuffed that he thought my piece was good enough, it’s made me want to write more.” Willie A.
“Brilliant night, have really enjoyed the whole project, learning all about Robert Burns, but the Burns Supper has made it really special and kind of brought everything to life.” Andrew M.
The Robert Burns Project and Burns Supper involved approximately 60 different prisoners in one capacity or another. This does not include those prisoners who were involved in the preparation and serving of the food. It has been truly inter disciplinary across a range of subjects with differentiated learning to be as inclusive as possible. It has been a thoroughly enjoyable experience for learners and staff.

Here is a short selection of poetry taken from the anthology
My love is deep and full of grace
I love that smile upon your face
When I wake up and turn around
I love to hear your soothing sound
And when I'm down and feeling low
Your heart is where I love to go
I feel your love as strong as mine
I love the way we intertwine
So as we age and then grow old
I won't care as I have you to hold. ( William)

Ach michty me sweet Rabbie Burns
Ye pass a lass n hir head turns
Yer silver tongue changed girns tae grins
Ach michty me, sweet Rabbie Burns ( William )

And taking the letters from his name, here is one from Willie
cleaRly
Our
Best
Ever
wRiter
To date

Burns
bUrns
buRns
burNs
burnS


Helensburgh Burns Club Launches a Schools Competition
The Helensburgh Burns Club held an inaugural annual competition including reciting poetry and singing for primary schools in Helensburgh and Lomond area.
Schools were invited to hold their own competitions for reading poems and singing for P4/5 and P6/7, the winners were then invited to compete against other schools, the finals being held at Hermitage Academy.
25 children from John Logie Baird, Garelochhead, Rhu and Cardross Primary Schools took part.
The winners were Laura Carmichael (Cardross) P6/7 singing.
Gregor Stewart (Cardross) P4/5 for singing and recital.
Emily Wilson (Cardross) P6/7 was the overall winner and received the Young Burnsian Trophy.
Robert Stevenson from the Jean Armour Burns Trust presented the shield.
The trophies and medals were donated by the Trust.
Schools Competition Winners with Robert Stevenson